DIY: Spider Pendant

baublesandbeads-spiderpendantsI love how the spiders begin to take over my garden with their webs every October. They serve to remind me that Halloween is just around the corner. Luckily my daughter has a good sense of humor and we often try to “scare” each other with fake spiders around the house. She was delighted when I brought home a couple of these beaded versions. Luckily, I am excited to make many more!!

Preparing the Wire Legs and Building the Body

baublesandbeadsspiderstep1Step 1: Cut 4 pieces of wire measuring 5 inches in length. Wrap the center point of each wire around a scrap piece of wire, tightly. This step will make a loop in the center of the wire so that it can later be strung onto the body of the spider.baublesandbeadsspiderstep2Step 2: Feed the following pattern of beads/wire onto the headpin: one 12mm bead, all four wire legs, one 10mm bead.

baublesandbeadsspiderstep3Step 3: Using round nose pliers, make a simple loop above the 10mm bead. If this technique is new to you we have a tutorial for that too, it will change you life (at least where earrings are concerned.)

TIP: If you are using coated wire and your pliers nick the finish simply use a Sharpie marker to hide the blemish.

For a Spider, It Is All About the Legs

The front and back legs of the spider are slightly shorter that the four middle legs. baublesandbeadsspiderstep4Step 4: String the following pattern of beads onto a front leg wire: 2 seed beads, 1 bugle bead, 2 seed beads, 1 bugle bead, 2 seed beads, 1 bugle bead, 2 seed beads.

baublesandbeadsspiderstep4-2Step 5: Cut the wire 1/4″ from the last bead. Secure the beads in place by turning the wire under, into a loop, with round nose pliers.

baublesandbeadsspiderstep4allStep 6: Repeat Step 4-5 on all four front and back legs.

baublesandbeadsspiderstep5Step 7: String the following pattern of beads onto a middle leg wire: 2 seed beads, 1 bugle bead, 1 seed bead, 1 3mm bead, 1 seed bead, 1 bugle bead, 2 seed beads, 1 bugle bead, 2 seed beads.

Step 8: Cut the wire 1/4″ from the last bead. Secure the beads in place by turning the wire under, into a loop, with round nose pliers.

Step 9: Repeat Step 7-8 on all four middle legs.

baublesandbeadsspiderfrontStep 10: Using your fingers shape the legs slightly to make the spider look more realistic.

And bam! you now have your first spider pendant. My favorite chain for this color combination is a black/gold cable chain or keep it simple and string this spider on a black leather cord.

Show off pics of your beaded spiders on our Facebook page. Our staff will choose a favorite and send that lucky winner a $25 gift card! We will choose the winner on October 31st 2016. Good luck.

DIY: Summer Chain Stack Necklace

ChainStackBaublesandBeadsSummertime jewelry ensembles require simplicity both in assembly and wear. Designs that feature chain provide the best of both worlds. We love this simple stacked necklace design that incorporates colorful glass beads with charms & chain. Make the design your own my using mixed metals, changing up the chain styles, using different lengths of chains and charms to set a mood.

materialsChainStackBaublesAndBeadsMaterials Required

Assembling the Three Chain Strands

Baubles & Beads Summer Chain Stack Necklace Step 1Step 1: : Cut the cable chain to a 18” length (or longer if desired). This will be the shortest strand. If needed attach a jump ring to the charm so that when it is strung onto the chain the charm faces forward.

Baubles & Beads Summer StackStep 2: On one end of the snake chain use chain nose pliers to fold each side of the fold over crimp securely against the chain. For best results, fold one side down snugly then fold the second side down over the first side. If any chain protrudes at the loop end simply cut off the excess chain with wire cutters.

TIP: Securing one end of the chain before stringing on the seed beads will ensure the beads don’t accidentally fall off the chain later.🙂

Baubles And Beads Summer StackStep 3: Cut the snake chain 2” longer than the first chain. Embellish the chain by adding color with size 8/0 seed beads. The amount of beads you use and the pattern is up to you. For reference we strung on about 6 inches of beads. Secure a fold over crimp onto the unfinished side of the chain. This will keep the beads from falling off the chain during final assemble.

TIP: Traditionally when making a multi-strand graduated length necklace each strand should vary in length by 2 inches.

baubles and beads summer stackStep 4: Cut the rolo chain to measure 2” longer that the snake chain. This is the longest strand. If needed, attach a jump ring to the charm so that when it is strung onto the chain the pendant faces forward. String on the final charm.

Attaching the Chains Together Summer Stack Step 5Step 5: Feed one end of each chain onto a jump ring and close the ring with chain nose pliers. Repeat this step on the opposite end of the chains making certain that the chains do not twist around each other in the process.

TIP: Soldered chain links can be stretched larger by inserting a tapered beading awl into the end link and gently forcing the awl into the link. By stretching the link in this manner the jewelry designer does not have to compromise durability when using small linked chain.

Step 6: Attach a swivel lobster clasp to one of the rings used to connect the chains together. Swivel style clasps help keep multiple strands from twisting during wear. On the opposite side of the necklace attach one additional ring and close it tightly.

TIP: Using additional rings to attach the clasp keeps the chains out of the way when putting on or taking off the necklace. Chain Stack Brass

Let us know what you think by commenting below. On July 18th we will randomly select a winner from the comment list to win the Summer Chain Stack Necklace in Silver! Good luck and happy summer beading!! (UPDATE: Congrats to Elaine who rocked the party and won herself one of the samples.)

DIY: Beads And Leather Wrap Bracelet

BeadsAndLeatherBraceletTutorialMaterials Needed:
40 inches of 1.5mm or 2mm leather cord
1 card of size #2 nylon thread with a needle attached
1 strand of 3mm hex-cut metal beads
1 shank style button that measures 15mm-30mm

Tools Needed:
Light duty flush cutters
1-2 Big eye needles, 2 ¼” in length
G-S Cement glue
2 clamps (optional)
A wooden work tray (optional)

Chan Luu-style bracelets seem to allure all of us. Who can resist a bracelet that wraps around your wrist multiple times displaying your favorite beads. I hope this tutorial will get you started with a new wrap bracelet obsession. Be sure to check out the very end of the tutorial for great tips on changing up the beads, # of wraps & more!

Attaching the Clasp & Preparing the Bracelet for Some Bead Action

Attach the Button www.baublesandbeads.comStep 1: Center the button on the leather cord and tie an overhand knot to hold it in place. Make sure the button can move freely on the leather loop.

Step #2 Remove the entire length of the thread from the card. String the big-eye needle onto the end of the thread that does not already have a needle attached.

TraySetUp www.baublesandbeads.comOptional: Some people prefer working this bracelet up with the use of clamps and a wooden tray. Fasten the button to one end of the tray with a clamp. Then secure the leather cords to the opposite end of the tray with another clamp, leaving a bit of space between the two cords for easy access when adding beads.

Stitching the Beads to the Leather

Step2* The photos display two colors of thread to make each step of the bracelet a bit easier to understand. In real life we are using just one color of thread.)

Step #3: Center a bead on the long length thread and position the bead in between the two leather cords, against the button, with the thread resting across the front of the leather cord.

Step #4: Bring one side of the thread (black thread in picture) around the outside edge of the leather and up thru the center, between the two leather cords.

Step #5: Using the needle, feed the same thread thru the bead hole and crossing over the front of the leather on the opposite side of the bracelet.

Step #6: Repeat Step 4 & Step 5 with the other thread (purple thread in picture). Pull both threads to tighten the stitch.

Step4 Wrap Bracelet www.baublesandbeads.comStep #7: Bring one side of the thread around the outside edge of the leather, up thru the center, and resting in front of the leather on the opposite side of the bracelet.

Step #8: String a bead on the same thread and position the bead in the space between the two pieces of leather.

Step #9: Feed the opposite thread around the outside of the leather, thru the bead hole, and crossing over the front of the leather on the opposite side of the bracelet.

Step #10: Pull both threads to tighten the stitch.

step5 Wrap Bracelet www.baublesandbeads.comStep #11: Continue securing beads in place by repeating Step 7-Step 10 until the bracelet wraps around your wrist two times. For an ideal fit make the bracelet long enough that the starting bead and the ending bead touch when wrapped snugly around your wrist.

Securing the Threads & Finishing the Clasp

The threads are secured in place by tying a surgeons knot with the two threads. If the bead hole is big enough the knot can be hidden inside the hole (a good reason to use large hole beads at the start and finish of the bracelet). Small hole beads require an alternate finishing technique, read on for more details.

Finishing Wrap Bracelet www.baublesandbeads.comStep #12: Flip the bracelet over and feed one of the threads back through the bead. (black thread in picture)

Step #13: Wrap thread from the previous step around the needle of the other thread two or three times.

Step #14: Feed the needle thru the bead and slowly pull the thread through the bead.  The “wraps” around the other thread will tighten into a knot that will be pulled inside the hole of the bead. If the bead hole is large enough repeat Step 13 & Step 14 again.

TIP: Beads with small holes will not accommodate multiple threads to be passed through with this technique. An alternative way to finish this bracelet is to simply knot the two threads together on the outside of the bead. The finishing knot will be exposed but can be worn on the inside of the bracelet. Most people prefer this method as it is super (duper) easy and for the most part the maker is the only one who notices the exposed thread.

Step #15: Glue the knot and allow it to dry. When the glue is dry (yes, wait for it to dry) cut the threads.

Loop Closeure of Wrap Bracelet www.baublesandbeads.comStep #16: Tie the two sides of the leather into an overhand knot positioned the knot close to the final bead stitch.

Step #17: Leaving enough room to accommodate the size of the button on the opposite end, tie a second overhand knot with the leather cords. Check to make certain the button fits into the loop before tightening the loop.

Step #18: Cut the ends of the leather approximate ½” from the knot. Or string a couple embellishment beads onto the individual leather cords and make an additional knot to keep them in place.

TIP: Light-duty flush cutters are an excellent way to easily cut through heavy cording materials while providing for a clean cut. These light-duty cutters are traditionally used to cut through the silk cord through between knotted pearls. The flat side of the cutter provides protection from damaging the bead while the blades cut cleanly through the fibers. They are also excellent for cutting soft wire up to 18 gauge.

Beads And Leather Wrap BraceletTips & Tricks

Cutting Leather Cord for Additional Wraps: Additional wraps require using a longer length of leather cord, thread, and additional beads. A general guideline to cutting the appropriate leather length is as follows: 1 wrap: 24 inches, 2 wraps: 40 inches, each additional wrap will require an addition 12 inches of leather. Remember we all have different sized wrists; play it safe by using a bit more leather than required.

Using Small Hole Beads: Small hole beads are exciting and it can be hard to limit yourself to beads with large holes only. When selecting smaller hole beads a thinner thread is required. I like Superlon or Nymo Size D for their excellent color selection. You may also need to use a finer needle. We like to use a size #10 needle for Nymo and Superlon.

Adding a New Thread: When making bracelets with more than two wraps additional thread will be required to complete the project. If you are using large hole beads simply knot off the old threads, glue & cut. Add the new thread by feeding one end through the last bead stitched, centering the thread, and resume beading like nothing happened.

(Winner has been notified and Kathy was one lucky beader! Thanks everyone!)Win a kit of supplies to make the wrap bracelet pictured at the top of this DIY. Simply pen a comment below for your chance to win. Winner will be notified January 5th, 2016. Good Luck!!!

DIY: Leather & Chain Kumihimo Braid

KumihimoBracelets1 BaublesAndBeads.comAncient technique meet contemporary materials in this great Kumihimo braided bracelet design. Mixing leather and chain has never been so easy; add a flashy clasp and 30 minutes from now you will have yourself a new favorite bracelet. A bit of wire wrapping experience is helpful to get professional looking results but the braid itself is super easy when using the handy braiding disk.Kumihimo Braid Materials Baubles & Beads

Securing the First Side of Cords & ChainSecuring Cords Baubles & BeadsStep 1: Cut all cords and chains to length.

Step 2: Tie an overhand knot at the center point in each of the leather cords.

Step 3: Using a length of the wire, feed the wire through the center of the knot on the cords and the center link of the chains. Position the cords & chain about 3” from the end of the wire.

Step 4: Cross over the two sides of the wire directly above the cords and chain. Secure the cord & chain to the wire by wrapping the short wire end around the longer tightly, two times. Cut the short wire tail flush against the wraps. The ends are now secured.

Wire Wrapping the End Cap in PlaceWireWrappingEnds Baubles&Beads

Step 5: Feed an end cap onto the end of the wire, hiding the wire connection.

Step 6: Feed on a daisy spacer bead for embellishment (optional).

Step 7: Make a wire wrapped loop on the end of the wire. (Later we will connect the clasp with jump rings.) Cut the remaining wire flush against the wire wrap.

Preparing the Cords and Chains for Braiding
There are four large black dots on the disk. These dots signify the starting position of each of the cords & chains. Our braiding material will be split up into 2 pairs of cords and 2 pairs of chains that will be positioned opposite of each other. Notice how the braiding disk has little slots that are numbered, while braiding we will moving along the disk in a counter clockwise fashion.StartingPointofBraid Baubles & BeadsStep 8: Position the secured end into the center of the disk, pointing away from you, and divide the cords and chain into pairs.

Step 9: Position the cords into the slots beside the top and bottom dots.

Step 10: Position the chains into the slots beside the dots on both sides.

Braiding the Cords & Chains
When braiding, try to maintain a consistent tension. The resulting braid should be centered in the middle of the disk hole. The resulting braid will be very tight and will require loosening for accurate length measurement.Step11-12 Baubles & BeadsStep 11: Bring the top right cord downward and position it into the bottom right slot of the disk.

Step 12: Bring the bottom left cord upward and position it into the top left slot of the disk. Turn the disk one quarter turn to the left (clockwise).Step13-14 Baubles & BeadsStep 13 Bring the top right chain downward and position it into the bottom right slot of the disk.

Step 14: Bring the bottom left chain upward and position it into the top left slot of the disk. Turn the disk one quarter turn to the left (clockwise).

Step 15: Repeat Steps 11-14 until your braid measures approximately 2.5 inches in length. Always complete the braid with the chains crossing over.LoosenTheBraid Baubles & BeadsStep 16: With the braid still positioned on the braiding disk, gently roll the braid between your fingers to loosen it. It should nearly double in length depending on the tension of the braid. The clasp and findings take up a lot of length in this design. An 8 inch bracelet is made up of about 5.25 inches of braid, ideal for a 6.5 inch wrist. Adjust the length of the braid to fit your needs.

Securing the 2nd Side of the BraidSteps18-20 Baubles & BeadsStep 17: Keep the braid on the disk. Tie the top right cord and the bottom right cord together into a tight double knot. Tie the two remaining cords together in the same way. Apply glue to both of the knots and allow the glue to dry.

Step 18: Cut the ends of the leather cords against the knots. Apply a bit of glue to the cut ends for added strength. Give the glue time to dry.

Step 19: Remove the chains from the braiding disk. Gather all four chains upward, above the leather cord knots.Finishing2ndSide BaublesAndBeads.comStep 20: Using a length of the wire, feed the wire through one link of each chain directly above the knots. Cut off the excess chain.

Step 21: Position the chains about 3” from the end of the wire. Bend the wire in half where the chains are attached to the wire. Secure the chain to the wire by wrapping the short wire end around the longer wire tightly, two times. Cut the short wire tail flush against the wraps. All ends are now secured.

Step 22: Repeat Steps 5-7 to position the end cap in place.AttachTheClasp BaublesAndBeads.comStep 23: Connect the clasp to the wire wrapped loops with jump rings.

Hooray! You’ve made your first Kumihimo braid. For your next project may we suggest using all leather or all chain in contrasting colors.

Happy Thursday -Chainmaille Castles

castle01_05[1] Just thought you needed to know about this chainmaille castle. From

The incredible, inventive bead work of rock star designer Miguel Ases


jewelry_earrings_miguel_ases_dress_me_up_1006[1] mases2001014046_p1_v1_m56577569831942795_254x500[1] jewelry_earrings_miguel_ases_deep_sea_2040[1] c8ef35293ba5675c3b7408ce0304644e[1] 0010[1] miguel-ases_pink-quartz-bronze-pear-earring_large[1] amethyst-lt-amethyst-hyrdo-qtz-swarovski-antique-silver-rondelle-miyuki[1]

Oh, Miguel, how do I love thee? Let me count the chain links on one of your earrings.

I found out about this artist when I was working for a designer and browsing a flash sale website called Max & Chloe: they have tons of fashion jewelry and on trend items, but I was pleasantly surprised to find his complex, intricate, and totally original work amid bibs and personalized “bling”.

His pieces are beaded with a technique I can’t quite identify, it has elements of brick stitch but with out the traditional base, and seems to attach beads with thread wrapped around wire forms, sort of wherever it’s needed, in order to forge these swooping ovals and teardrop shapes, and some more free form than that, while incorporating teeny bits of chain and gemstones through out.

He does bracelets and necklaces too of course, but they are so very complex and involved that they don’t seem to translate quite as well in pictures, so I’ve only included my favorite earrings here.

One thing I particularly appreciate about his work is his palette. There are so many glorious color combinations, coupled with his unique assembly, that just wow me. And I really love that his price point isn’t so terribly out of range for us ordinary folk: sure, it would be a splurge, but not like something only the truly wealthy can enjoy.

I am in complete awe of the breadth of his collection, in color, style, and size. It’s so varied, yet I can see connections between even very different pieces, in the way he puts things together, chooses colors, and the forms the beads take as they marry in thread paths. I’m so in love with his work, I just want to go straight to the studio and try to humbly imitate.

See for yourself and be inspired.


orig[1] Open%20Bar%20Earrings%20from%20Miguel%20Ases%2033006-450x450[1]


Celie Fago’s Amazing PMC and Polymer Jewelry

The Art of Celie Fagocelie-fago-051_med[1] I stumbled on this artist’s website through an email from one of our vendors, just clicking around and found her exquisite work amid many beautiful artist profiles. I love the combination of colors, textures, and different materials. She uses polymer clay in a way I’ve never seen, carving it like wood or bone, and with intricate details of stroke and design that give a rich and full dimension to her pieces. Additionally, she incorporates unexpected elements such as wires, fiber and glass beads—making some of the most unique bracelets and pendants I’ve ever seen!

Like many artists with a comprehensive vision such as hers, Celie is a self taught artist. She’s been working in different mediums for over 35 years and has exhibited worldwide, including in Japan at the Mitsubishi Material Corporation’s special collections, the company who invented and manufactured Precious Metal Clay in the early ’90s. She has authored a book on keum boo, instructed at different workshops and institutions, and even offers classes at her home studio in Vermont. What a wonder woman! So inspiring.

See the gallery below.

cf-012_med[1] braceletscut_med-3[1] proriverrockring_med-3[1] 3ringsbb_med-2[1] polymerflipring_med-2[1] podpendant_med-2[1] newvessel_med-2[1]

Her website is for more pictures and a bio!


Check out this unbelievable designer


There are so many wonderful designs from this brand, BrokenFab, where do I even begin? The colors, the fresh shapes and motifs, it makes me feel like I’ve entered a wonderland of texture and style. There’s obviously a whimsical approach to design, but clearly a rich, informed palette and an eye for geometric splendor. I never knew I loved neon until now!

From designer Fabienne Morel’s bio:

“Heavily influenced by ‘80s and ‘90s club and pop culture, as well as post-modernist design, the intricately beaded rocaille pieces that Fabienne creates are rich in historical references. Strong geometrics recall classic album covers as well as an exploration of spiritualism, making for edgy, distinctive pieces that are wearable on a daily basis.”

I’m so in love!

See more delicious pieces:



See more at

TierraCast Tour

One of my first purchases from an official bead store was in the mid 1990’s, at a bead store in Cambridge, MA. It was a small antique silver plated goddess charm by TierraCast. I still own that charm as at the time it was just too special to actually use. Across the country in Berkeley, CA Jim & Lisa Kaufman’s bead store, Baubles & Beads, was in its infancy, and Julia, our current store manager, was a high school student who shopped at their store. None of us knew one another, we were all just beaders who could never imagine that nearly two decades later we would all be working together at Baubles & Beads and going on a field trip tour the TierraCast facilities. TCI-Logo-WebChances are if you have ever made jewelry with base metal beads or components you too have introduced TierraCast products into your own collection. It was with great pleasure and much anticipation we were given the opportunity to tour the factory and learn more about the production of those fabulous finds and meet the people who create them.

We were met by Julia wearing a fabulous ring made by Tania Skevos, a former store manager of Baubles & Beads who is now quite famous.

We were met by Julie who wearing a fabulous ring made by Tania Skevos, a former store manager of Baubles & Beads who is now quite famous.

Upon our arrival we met up with Julie, our ambassador for the day. Her bubbly enthusiasm immediately struck a chord with us as we too are excited to share the story of growth and change of another small business.

Meet Tracy, she is TierraCast's marketing guru.

Meet Tracy, she is TierraCast’s jewelry designer and marketing maven.

She began by introducing us to several people we had interacted with on the phone, through email, and whose names we’d recognize from years of doing business together.

Alan Joseph, one of the company owners and product designer, was our tour guide and he guided us through the entire impressive compound, in order of production from design idea to finished piece. Every piece is made under the same house except for the plating including: design, production, manufacturing, sales, and marketing.

Digital rendering meet the finished piece.

Digital rendering meet the finished piece.

Alan works entirely through graphic design templates on his computer when designing the beautiful and detailed signature TierraCast pieces. He has a background in fine art, so the process starts with that in mind. The products go through rigorous testing periods before they make it to you, the beader. Only 1 in 10 design ideas actually make it into the product line.Scotts BenchAfter all design specifics have been developed digitally he then hands the work off to his team of metalsmith geniuses to begin the task of making a model.  Above is a picture of Scott’s bench, he trained at Tiffany. Be sure to zoom in on the pic to get a good look at all his tools. The window directly in front of his bench looks out to a tranquil garden setting, now that’s what we call a good day’s work! microscopePerfection is required, evident by the microscope in the room. Once the piece has gone through the intensive and fastidious design process, they begin production by making a mold.stackofmoldsMolds are made by pressing silicone in a steel plate that is heated. We were impressed by the organization in the mold making room. Notice in the background of the photo above how the finished molds are arranged. There is a whole back room filled with molds.MoldsEach mold only has a lifespan of about 300 uses. The mold maker was on vacation the day of our tour. He just celebrated 25 years at TierraCast. Definitely a sign of a good company to work for.pewtersolidTierraCast excels in the use high quality pewter. The standard for lead content in culinary pewter is 500ppm. TierraCast uses a pewter alloy called Britannia that contains lead in the minute level of less than 100 ppm. Most pieces have about 25-35ppm of lead content.MoltenMetalWe step over to the next room and find a vat of molten metal next to the casting machine. casterWomanRocksThe caster pours the molten metal into the opening of the mold located in a centrifuge. Centrifugal force pushes the molten metal evenly throughout the mold making for consistent results. Angela, the caster pictured above is one of the fastest casters at TierraCast.buttonsOnATreeOnce the caster has produced a large quantity of product they then simply break the pieces off the “tree”. It is a testament to the fine craftsmanship of the mold maker that no hand finishing is required after removing the product from the tree.removalofbeadsHow dreamy that the day we visited they were casting one of our best-selling items: the Buddha Bead.  A short walk away is another building that houses the finishing room.HomemadeTumblerMy little Lortone tumbler is nothing compared to TierraCast’s homemade version. These drums are filled with cast pieces and different tumbling media to help quickly remove any burrs or imperfections. Once the pieces are tumbled they are sent off-site to be plated. Plating is the only process that does not happen in-house. Upon return from the plater, TierraCast applies chemical antiquing as needed.fillingorders

When we opened the door to the order fulfillment office a blast of cold air struck us; a true sign of women working in here. This room was filled with drawer after drawer of beads, charms, pendants, bails, button, findings, clasps, earwires, oh my gosh I can’t list all of the wonder inside. Sorry the pic so so fuzzy but those ladies work fast!! julieandlisaThe conclusion of our tour left us time for photo ops with each other. Above is one of myself and Julie. We all know Julie well as she has been TierraCast’s sales rep for a long time. We often meet up at the bead shows in Tucson and Milwaukee. lkandjulieNext up is Lisa Kaufman , co-owner of Baubles & Beads, and Julie. Have we mentioned how fun Julie is?organizationAnd to finish us off we have Julia, our store manager, loving the tidiness of the entire place. Interestingly enough, between three of us photographing our tour, Jim Kaufman (the incredibly handsome co-owner of Baubles & Beads) never made it into any of our photos.


DIY -Mixed Metal Lotus Pendant

lotusdrops2Besides being super sultry against the skin, one of the things I love about this design is its simplicity to make and all the possibilities for customization. Once you make a pendant you’ll find yourself making a pair of earrings to match. There are many different component pieces out there just waiting for you to embellish them with beads and wire! Enjoy.

Tools Neededlotusmaterials

Flush Wire Cutters
Chain Nose Pliers, 2 pairs are helpful

Materials Needed
1 Lotus petal drop link
27 inches of 2mm rolo chain
11, 4mm jump rings
1, 5mm jump ring
1 Toggle clasp
Ten 2.5mm crystal rondelles
Five 2.5mm square beads
One foot of 26 gauge wire
Eight 2.25mm metal hex-cut spacer beads

Wiring the Beads to the Lotus Frame

Each segment of beads is attached to the frame with a 3 inch length of wire. The wire coils used to secure the beads to the frame wrap upward, toward the point of the frame, allowing for proper spacing between the bead rows. Steps1-2Step 1: Secure one end of the wire to the frame by laying the wire across the face of the frame and wrapping a 1″ tail around the frame, toward the top, three times. The resulting coil should be tight with each coil resting against the previous one.

Step 2: Using flush wire cutters, cut the wire tail off, close to the frame. If the wire end is sticking out, squeeze it down with a pair of chain nose pliers.

Step 3: String 3 crystal beads onto the wire and position the coil on the frame so that all three beads fit within the frame.Steps4-5Step 4: Secure the wire in place by wrapping it tightly around the frame three times, toward the top of the frame. Use the chain nose pliers to help pull the wire tight.

Step 5: Using flush wire cutters, cut the remaining wire close to the frame.addingbeadrowsStep 6: Continue adding rows of beads using the same techniques outlined in Steps 1 thru 5. Make certain that each row accommodates the beads within the spacing of the frame, adjust the number of beads if needed.

The pattern for each row is as follows:
Row 1: Three crystal beads (this row has been completed)
Row 2: Five 2.5mm square metal beads
Row 3: Seven crystal beads
Row 4: Eight Hex-cut beads

Adding the Chain Fringechainfringe

Step 1: Using wire cutters, cut the following measured length of chain: 2 pieces measuring 1/2″ each, 2 pieces measuring 3/4″ each, 2 pieces measuring 1″ each, 2 pieces measuring 1 1/4″ each, and 1 piece measuring 1 1/2″ in length.

Step 2: Organize the chains by size on your working surface so that the longest chain length is in the middle and the shortest lengths are on the outside edge. Organizing the chains ahead of time will make attaching them easier.

Step 3: Using chain nose pliers, attach the chain lengths to the bottom of the frame with a 4mm jump ring. Make sure to close the ring tight so that the chains do not fall off later.

Attaching the Necklaceaddingchain-clasp

Step 1: Using wire cutters, cut the remaining chain to 18″.

Step 2: Connect a 5mm jump ring to the top of the frame and feed the chain length through it.

Step 3: Connect the clasp to the last link of one end of the chain with a 4mm jump ring.

Step 4: Connect a 5mm jump ring into the last link of the opposite end of the chain.


WE LOVE READING YOUR COMMENTS!! Comment on this post for your chance to win a kit of materials to make your own. Winner will be chosen randomly and announced on August 12th!


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