DIY: Art Deco Swing Earrings

Staying in the summertime groove of lightweight, slinky and sparkly is a must for jewelry projects this season. These earrings have so many possibilities that I couldn’t limit myself to only providing the pattern for one design, I also included the pattern for a pair that uses rhinestone chain. They are so simple (okay, one step is kinda frustrating) you will be inspired to customize the pattern yourself.

I’d love to see what you make from this DIY. Post your pics on Baubles & Beads Facebook page by August 2017 and I’ll hook you up with a coupon code to help you purchase more supplies.

Materials Needed (for the gold pair)MaterialsArtDeco-BaublesAndBeads

Preparing the Chain

Counting ball links is the least wasteful method of cutting the chain. It’s not so great for those of us with lacking 20/20 vision. Keep this technique chill by starting with each chain the longest length and then cut the rest down to size.

Step1ArtDecoSwing-BaublesAndBeadsStep 1: Cut the following number of chains into 1 3/4″ lengths: 8 black pieces, 4 silver pieces, 6 gold pieces. Repeat this step for the second earring and set them aside.

Securing the Chains into the End Cap

Step2ArtDecoSwing-BaublesAndBeadsStep 2: Feed one ball link of each chain into the slot of the end bar in the following pattern: 2 black, 2 gold, 2 silver, 2 black, 2 gold, 2 black, 2 silver, 2 gold, 2 black. Repeat this step for the other earring and set aside.

Step3ArtDecoSwing-BaublesAndBeadsStep 3: Using chain nose pliers gently fold the open end of the end cap closed while making sure no chains fall out of the cap (this is the tricky part). I usually use the tool to get the end to fold downward and then secure it tight by pushing the end against the edge of a table or hard surface. Make certain the end is closed enough that the chains can’t fall out. Repeat this step on the other earring and start to get excited.

Cutting the Fringe Pattern

It is inevitable that even though I measured each length of chain they are are different lengths. I like to count the ball links of center two chains so that I am certain the two earrings are a match. (I will also admit I counted them, all 32, by taking a picture of the earrings and zooming in on my phone so I could easily see the ball links.) I have made a lot of these earrings and every time I cut the fringe a bit different, usually because I make a mistake.

Step4ArtDecoSwing-BaublesAndBeads.jpgStep 4: Each length of fringe decreases by two links from the center two chains. Cut each chain, one by one, starting from the center and working toward the ends. If you make a mistake simply repeat it on the other side and call it a custom design. Repeat the same pattern on the opposite earring.

Attach the Ear Wire

Step5-ArtDecoSwing-BaublesAndBeadsStep 5: Using chain nose pliers, attach the open loop of your ear wire to the loop on the end bar.

Designer’s Musing: If you are a keen tutorial reader you may have noticed my picture of materials includes a lever back ear wire while my list of materials uses a post. When I connected the lever back to the end bar I discovered the loop on the lever back was too small to allow the earring to dangle freely so I opted for the post earring instead. To keep my ears from reacting to the metal I always use precious metal ear wires on my designs even if the other materials are base metal, unless of course they are for someone who always loses the earrings I give her 🙂

But Wait There’s More…

When I decided to write this tutorial I had a hard time decided which earring to make. Why not both? Check out this hottie… (recipe ingredients are included below). Same technique just different chains.

Art Deco Sparkle Earrings

ArtDecoRhinestone-BaublesAndBeadsMaterials Needed (silver pair)

Win one of the samples by commen ting on this post before May 29th, 2017. We will choose one lucky winner and contact you for shipping details, good luck, & most importantly enjoy!

DIY: 11 Fast, Fun, Easy and Done Designs

With the upcoming holidays we are all feeling the pressure to share a bit of our jewelry making talent with friends and family. What we often forget is that sometimes simple is the best expression of love. When it comes easy, it is meant to be. With that in mind we have created a dozen designs to help you finish your gift list. Each piece can be completed in about five minutes, uses only basic jump ring connections, and is easy on the budget. Keep it creative by customizing your selection of colors and materials. Check out our collections below and links to the supplies to make your own. At the bottom of this post are some tips to working with jump rings.

The Necklace Collection

The Fiesta Necklace

BaublesAndBeads necklacefiestachainMaterials Needed:

I love, love, love this chain! Use steel design stamps on the individual links to customize your creation. On this piece we cut our Fiesta chain in to 2 pieces; one measuring 10 inches and the other measuring 12 inches. Any chain can be used for the back of the necklace. Simply connect all pieces of chain and the clasp together with jump rings.

The Shag Necklace

BaublesAndBeadsnecklacebardropchainMaterials Needed:

This chain is so perfect that one doesn’t even need to add additional embellishment. Simply use jump rings to connect a clasp; makes a great bracelet too.

The Art Deco Fan Necklace

BaublesAndBeadsartdecofannecklaceMaterials Needed:

Originally I intended to only use 3 of the art deco festoon connectors in the front and fill the rest of the necklace with chain, but they looked so good that I changed my mind and used the connectors throughout the necklace.

The Charm Necklace

baublesandBeadsnecklacecharmcollectionMaterials Needed:

Quite possibly the easiest and most personal jewelry one can make for another. Simply find a charm that represents the person and feed it onto a finished chain or cord. Make a statement by stacking several different charms onto the same necklace.

The Bracelet Collection

The Chevron Bracelet

BaublesAndBeads braceletchevronchainMaterials Needed:

Another example of how a great chain is all one needs to make a great piece of jewelry. Simply cut the chain to size and attach a clasp with jump rings. Makes a great necklace too!

The Druzy Dust Bracelet

braceletdruzyconnectorMaterials Needed:

Any connector or link can be used to make a easy statement piece. As with all the designs featured here, jump rings are your friends.

Adjustable Bead & Leather Bracelet

baublesandbeadspicassobraceletMaterials Needed:

Okay, this one is super easy and is a great use for large hole beads. A few well placed overhand knots will keep your beads in order while the ingenious adjustable String-On clasp will give this bracelet great functionality.

The Earring Collection

Mixed Metal Ring Earrings

earringsmixedmetalringsMaterials Needed:

Any 2 link can make for a great earring and so simple all one needs to do is connect the links to the loop of the earwire.

Spike Drop Earrings

earringsspikedropMaterials Needed:

Any pendant or charm can be easily attached to an ear wire. Visually check to be certain the charm will face forward once connected to the ear wire. If not use a jump ring to connect the two pieces together so that the charm faces forward.

Filligree Donut Earrings

earringsfiligreediscMaterials Needed:

We just had to sneak in a bead, we are Baubles & Beads afterall 🙂 Attach beads to any connector by stringing the bead onto a headpin and making a simple loop. We have a great tutorial on making simple loops here.

Edelweiss Earrings

baublesandbeads-edelweissearringsMaterials Needed:

The ever popular Swarovski Edelweiss pendant is always a winner. Simply feed a pair of hoops through the ample sized hole. Easily make a necklace by attaching a jump ring through the hole and feeding the pendant onto a finished chain.

Jump Ring Techniques & Tips

Jump rings tend to be the weakest link in most jewelry designs but at the same time they are the work horse of jewelry connections. When selecting a jump ring we recommend using the thickest gauge (diameter of wire) that will fit through the pieces to be linked together. Ideally we prefer using 18 gauge jump rings whenever possible, but this size is often too thick to fit into small link chains.  When working with fine chain one often must use 22 gauge (the higher the gauge #, the smaller the diameter of wire). Jewelry using 22 gauge jump rings for connections are often considered delicate pieces and should be worn accordingly.

baublesandbeadsclosingjumpringsWhen closing jump rings it is essential that the two sides of the ring come together completely. Ideally one should use two pairs of chain nose pliers (many people prefer working with one pair of chain nose pliers and one pair of bent chain nose pliers. Hold one side of the ring steady and use your dominant hand to align the two sides of the ring together.

These are the steps I use to close rings although everyone seems to have their own personal touch to closing a ring:

  • Hold one side steady using a pair of chain nose pliers.
  • Feed on all links to be connected together by the ring.
  • Using a second pair of chain nose pliers, grip the opposite side of the ring and slowly bring the two ends of the ring together.
  • Often times when closing a ring I will perfectly align the two ends only to have the side I am moving spring back open. This can be corrected by slightly over-closing the ring so that when I release my grip the side will spring into perfect position.
  • Practice makes perfect when it comes to closing jump rings. Remember, they are the weakest link and care should be taken to properly align and close the ends snug.

DIY: Summer Chain Stack Necklace

ChainStackBaublesandBeadsSummertime jewelry ensembles require simplicity both in assembly and wear. Designs that feature chain provide the best of both worlds. We love this simple stacked necklace design that incorporates colorful glass beads with charms & chain. Make the design your own my using mixed metals, changing up the chain styles, using different lengths of chains and charms to set a mood.

materialsChainStackBaublesAndBeadsMaterials Required

Assembling the Three Chain Strands

Baubles & Beads Summer Chain Stack Necklace Step 1Step 1: : Cut the cable chain to a 18” length (or longer if desired). This will be the shortest strand. If needed attach a jump ring to the charm so that when it is strung onto the chain the charm faces forward.

Baubles & Beads Summer StackStep 2: On one end of the snake chain use chain nose pliers to fold each side of the fold over crimp securely against the chain. For best results, fold one side down snugly then fold the second side down over the first side. If any chain protrudes at the loop end simply cut off the excess chain with wire cutters.

TIP: Securing one end of the chain before stringing on the seed beads will ensure the beads don’t accidentally fall off the chain later. 🙂

Baubles And Beads Summer StackStep 3: Cut the snake chain 2” longer than the first chain. Embellish the chain by adding color with size 8/0 seed beads. The amount of beads you use and the pattern is up to you. For reference we strung on about 6 inches of beads. Secure a fold over crimp onto the unfinished side of the chain. This will keep the beads from falling off the chain during final assemble.

TIP: Traditionally when making a multi-strand graduated length necklace each strand should vary in length by 2 inches.

baubles and beads summer stackStep 4: Cut the rolo chain to measure 2” longer that the snake chain. This is the longest strand. If needed, attach a jump ring to the charm so that when it is strung onto the chain the pendant faces forward. String on the final charm.

Attaching the Chains Together

BaublesAndBeads.com Summer Stack Step 5Step 5: Feed one end of each chain onto a jump ring and close the ring with chain nose pliers. Repeat this step on the opposite end of the chains making certain that the chains do not twist around each other in the process.

TIP: Soldered chain links can be stretched larger by inserting a tapered beading awl into the end link and gently forcing the awl into the link. By stretching the link in this manner the jewelry designer does not have to compromise durability when using small linked chain.

Step 6: Attach a swivel lobster clasp to one of the rings used to connect the chains together. Swivel style clasps help keep multiple strands from twisting during wear. On the opposite side of the necklace attach one additional ring and close it tightly.

TIP: Using additional rings to attach the clasp keeps the chains out of the way when putting on or taking off the necklace.

BaublesAndBeads.com Chain Stack Brass

Let us know what you think by commenting below. On July 18th we will randomly select a winner from the comment list to win the Summer Chain Stack Necklace in Silver! Good luck and happy summer beading!! (UPDATE: Congrats to Elaine who rocked the party and won herself one of the samples.)

DIY -Mixed Metal Lotus Pendant

lotusdrops2Besides being super sultry against the skin, one of the things I love about this design is its simplicity to make and all the possibilities for customization. Once you make a pendant you’ll find yourself making a pair of earrings to match. There are many different component pieces out there just waiting for you to embellish them with beads and wire! Enjoy.

Tools Neededlotusmaterials

Flush Wire Cutters
Chain Nose Pliers, 2 pairs are helpful

Materials Needed
1 Lotus petal drop link
27 inches of 2mm rolo chain
11, 4mm jump rings
1, 5mm jump ring
1 Toggle clasp
Ten 2.5mm crystal rondelles
Five 2.5mm square beads
One foot of 26 gauge wire
Eight 2.25mm metal hex-cut spacer beads

Wiring the Beads to the Lotus Frame

Each segment of beads is attached to the frame with a 3 inch length of wire. The wire coils used to secure the beads to the frame wrap upward, toward the point of the frame, allowing for proper spacing between the bead rows. Steps1-2Step 1: Secure one end of the wire to the frame by laying the wire across the face of the frame and wrapping a 1″ tail around the frame, toward the top, three times. The resulting coil should be tight with each coil resting against the previous one.

Step 2: Using flush wire cutters, cut the wire tail off, close to the frame. If the wire end is sticking out, squeeze it down with a pair of chain nose pliers.

Step 3: String 3 crystal beads onto the wire and position the coil on the frame so that all three beads fit within the frame.Steps4-5Step 4: Secure the wire in place by wrapping it tightly around the frame three times, toward the top of the frame. Use the chain nose pliers to help pull the wire tight.

Step 5: Using flush wire cutters, cut the remaining wire close to the frame.addingbeadrowsStep 6: Continue adding rows of beads using the same techniques outlined in Steps 1 thru 5. Make certain that each row accommodates the beads within the spacing of the frame, adjust the number of beads if needed.

The pattern for each row is as follows:
Row 1: Three crystal beads (this row has been completed)
Row 2: Five 2.5mm square metal beads
Row 3: Seven crystal beads
Row 4: Eight Hex-cut beads

Adding the Chain Fringechainfringe

Step 1: Using wire cutters, cut the following measured length of chain: 2 pieces measuring 1/2″ each, 2 pieces measuring 3/4″ each, 2 pieces measuring 1″ each, 2 pieces measuring 1 1/4″ each, and 1 piece measuring 1 1/2″ in length.

Step 2: Organize the chains by size on your working surface so that the longest chain length is in the middle and the shortest lengths are on the outside edge. Organizing the chains ahead of time will make attaching them easier.

Step 3: Using chain nose pliers, attach the chain lengths to the bottom of the frame with a 4mm jump ring. Make sure to close the ring tight so that the chains do not fall off later.

Attaching the Necklaceaddingchain-clasp

Step 1: Using wire cutters, cut the remaining chain to 18″.

Step 2: Connect a 5mm jump ring to the top of the frame and feed the chain length through it.

Step 3: Connect the clasp to the last link of one end of the chain with a 4mm jump ring.

Step 4: Connect a 5mm jump ring into the last link of the opposite end of the chain.

 

WE LOVE READING YOUR COMMENTS!! Comment on this post for your chance to win a kit of materials to make your own. Winner will be chosen randomly and announced on August 12th!

 

DIY -Spikey Bracelet

newstudsI love the idea of punk meets classic; in this case, spikes meet seed beads! The construction of this pattern uses clamshell bead tips at each end. Since the thread used to make the bracelet is very fine, I use a seed bead as a stop-bead inside the bead tip. This technique allows one to anchor the thread at each end by feeding the thread through the bead tip, then the stop-bead, and then back through the bead tip positioning the thread for another pass through the bracelet. When adding a new length of thread to the project simply knot the old thread to the seed bead and knot the new one onto the same seed bead. In the end we will glue the knots and conceal it all by closing the bead tip shut!

Tools Neededmaterials300
Round Nose Pliers
Flush Wire Cutters or Sharp Scissors
Chain Nose Pliers

Materials Needed
Size 10 beading needles
Fireline thread
Japanese size 8/0 seed beads
Japanese size 11/0 seed beads
16 Glass Spike Beads 17mm x 7mm (Alternatively you can use any round 6mm bead to replace the spikes)
2 clamshell bead tips
2 heavy gauge jump rings
1 clasp
Hypo-tube cement

String the Base Row

Step 1: Thread the needle with a double arm’s length of Fireline. Double over the tail of the thread so that one side is about 1 foot longer, this will make the length  easier to manage.

Tie a stop-bead onto the end of the thread and string on the clamshell.

Tie a stop-bead onto the end of the thread and string on the clamshell bead tip.

Step 2: Tie a size 11/0 seed bead (stop-bead) onto the end of the longer thread, leaving a 4 inch tail.

Step 3: String through a clamshell bead tip so that the stop-bead rests inside the bead tip. Leave the bead tip open.

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String the beads to make the desired bracelet length. Secure the end of the bracelet by adding a new clamshell bead tip, followed by a stop-bead, and then string back through the bead tip and 1st spike bead.

Step 4: String the beads onto the thread in the following pattern: 1 spike, 2 size 8/0 seed beads, 1 spike. Continue stringing the bead pattern of 2 size 8/0 seed beads and 1 spike until the desired length of the bracelet is achieved. 16 spikes will make a bracelet approximately 7.5” long depending on the size of clasp chosen.

Step 5: String through the back-end of the 2nd bead tip.

Step 6: String a size 11/0 seed bead (stop-bead) onto the thread and then go back through the bead tip toward the beads.

Step 7: For added strength of the base row, string the needle and thread back through all of the beads and into the 1st bead tip. Anchor the thread by feeding the thread through the seed bead inside the bead tip and finally back through the bead tip and the 1st spike bead.

Add Seed Bead Embellishment to the Sides of the Spikes

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Add embellishment to both sides of the spike bead by stringing on six 11/0 seed beads and feeding the needle through the hole on the opposite end of the spike bead.

Step 8: With the thread coming out of a spike bead, string six size 11/0 seed beads. Feed the needle through the hole on the opposite end of the same spike bead. The seed beads will shape around the side of the spike bead. Repeat this step adding the same number of beads to the other side of the spike.

Step 9: Feed the needle through the two size 8/0 seed beads and the next spike.

Step 10: Repeat step 8 & 9 until each spike bead is embellished. When complete, anchor the thread by feeding the needle up through the bead tip, through the stop-bead, and then back through the bead tip.

Add Final Structure to the Base Row

Add structure by adding a size 8/0 seedbead in between each cluster of size 11/0 seedbeads. Repeat on the opposite side of the bracelet.

Add structure by adding a size 8/0 seed bead in between each cluster of size 11/0 seed beads. Repeat on the opposite side of the bracelet.

Step 11: Working on one side of the bracelet; feed the needle through the nearest six size 11/0 seed beads on one side of the spike bead. String on a new size 8/0 seed bead.

Step 12: Repeat step 11 for the length of the bracelet to add structure between the seed bead embellishment on the sides of the spike beads. Anchor the thread in the clamshell and repeat Step 11 on the opposite side of the bracelet.

Step 13: Knot the working thread to the stop-bead inside the clamshell.

Step 14: Secure the knots by dabbing them with GS Hypo-Tube Cement. Allow 5 minutes for the glue to dry then cut the thread ends with scissors or wire cutters.

Attach the Clasp

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Gently close the bead tips and use round nose pliers to round out and close the bead tips. Use chain nose pliers to attach the clasp to the bead tips with jump rings.

Step 15: Close the bead tips over the stop-bead and knots; first using your fingers and then giving the bead tips a final gentle squeeze with chain nose pliers.

Step 16: Using chain nose pliers, attach a jump ring to the loop of the bead tip and one side of the clasp. Repeat on the opposite side.

WE LOVE READING YOUR COMMENTS!! Comment on this post for your chance to win a kit of materials to make your own. Winner will be chosen randomly and announced on May 1st!

DIY -Braided Hex Cut Bead Bracelet

hexcutbeadsbraidTools Needed
Scissors

Materials Neededmaterials
5 feet waxed linen cord
120(+or-) 2.25mm metal hex spacer beads
1 large hole bead

What fun!! This bracelet is made by incorporating beads into a braid of waxed linen cord. We have made a dozen of these using everything from size 8/0 seed beads ( rounds, & magatmas) to 3mm faceted glass; really any small bead that will fit onto the cord will work.

Preparing the Cords

Step 1: Cut the waxed linen into two 30 inch lengths.

Step 2: Hold the two cords side-by-side and run your fingers along the two strands. The wax on the linen will make the two strands stick together as if they were a single strand.

Making the Clasp Loop05grouping

Step 3: String 17 hex beads onto the end of the two cords and position them in the middle of the cords. (If using a different bead to clasp the bracelet, adjust the number of beads used here to fit snugly over the bead.)

Step 4: Shape the beaded segment of cord into a loop. Secure the loop closed by tying both sides of the cord into an overhand knot. Make sure the knot is positioned against the beads before tightening.

Step 5: Separate the individual strands of cord and cut one strand off with scissors. Three strands will remain.

Braiding the Beads in Place06beads

Step 6: String about 30 hex beads onto one of the cords. Tie a loose knot around the final bead, near the end of the cord, to keep the beads from falling off the strand during braiding. Repeat this step on the remaining strands.

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Step 7: Fan out the three strands. Beginning with the left hand strand, push a bead up against the overhand knot. Cross the cord over the front of the middle strand.

Step 8: Push a bead against the overhand knot of the right-hand strand. Cross the cord over the front of the middle strand.

Step 9: Continue braiding the beads in place by positioning a bead against the braid and crossing the cord over the front of the middle strand, alternating from left to right. Add (or subtract) beads as needed until the bracelet fits loosely around the wrist from the tip of the loop to the end of braid.

Finishing the Braceletfinishingthebraid

Step 10: Continue braiding the beads in place until the braided segment fits loosely around the wrist from the tip of the loop to the end of the braid.

Step 11: Secure the end of the cord by tying all three cords together into an overhand.

claspbeadending

Step 12: String a large hole bead onto the cords.

Step 13: Secure the bead in place by tying another overhand knot up against the bottom of the bead. Be sure to make certain that the knot is large enough to hold the bead in place. If not, tie an additional overhand knot on top of the one made in the previous step.

Step 14: Finish off each of the cords by stringing a single bead onto the individual cords and tying a single overhand knot to hold the bead in place. Cut off excess thread.  Vary the length of each of the threads for a tassel effect.

We love reading your comments! Drop us a line in the comment section and you qualify for a chance to win a kit of supplies used to make this bracelet. Winner will be chosen March 31st and notified via email. Good luck -BSG

DIY -Textured Swag Necklace

With so many new beads arriving in the bead store I was feeling the need to use them all, or at least as many as I could fit in one necklace! This necklace uses basic beading techniques to build a wonderfully scrumptious necklace that is surprisingly lightweight and ever so easy to wear. Mix and match your favorite colors and shapes to make a different design each time!finishednecklace

Supplies

Supplies

Tools Needed
Flush Wire Cutters
2 pairs of chain Nose Pliers
Crimp Tool
Ruler or tape measure

Materials Needed
5 1/2 inches 4mm rhinestone chain
1 pair rhinestone chain crimp ends
6 1/2 inches 3mm rolo chain
18 inches circle charm chain
16 heavy 6mm jump rings
2 end bars with 6 holes
1 large toggle clasp
1 strand (35pcs) 4mm firepolished glass beads
1 strand (42pcs)4mm Swarovski crystal pearls
3 packages (50pcs) 4mm Swarovski crystal bicones
1 yard Softflex wire, size .014″ cut into 1 foot lengths
Six tube shaped crimp beads, size 2mm x 2mm

Designer’s Tip: Each strand is strung or cut to length before attaching the individual strands to the end bars. The graduated appearance is achieved by adding 1/2 inch of length to each strand. Measurements must include any added length created by crimp ends or crimp beads but do not include the jump ring that the Softflex is attached to. This tutorial lists the exact number of beads used for each strand,  if you are using different beads use  following the measurement guidelines as follows:

1st strand: 5 1/2 inches rhinestone chain
2nd strand: 6 inches of strung 4mm firepolish beads
3rd strand: 6 1/2 inches 3mm rolo chain
4th strand: 7 inches 4mm Swarovski pearls
5th strand: 7 1/2 inches 4mm Swarovski bicones
6th strand: 8 inches circle charm chain

Preparing the Six Strands

Attach the crimp ends onto a 5 1/2" length of rhinestone chain.

Attach the crimp ends onto a 5 1/2″ length of rhinestone chain.

Strand 1:

  • Place one end of the rhinestone chain into the crimp end and secure it in place by using chain nose pliers to gently fold the prongs inward against the rhinestone.
  • Cut the chain so that there are a total of 20 links (or 5 1/2″).
  • Attach the second crimp end on the opposite end of the chain.
Close two jump rings. String the beads and secure a jump ring on each end with a crimp bead.

Close two jump rings, secure the Softflex to the jump ring with a crimp bead, string the beads and secure another jump ring on the opposite end with a second crimp bead.

Strand 2:

  • Using chain nose pliers, close two jump rings.
  • Feed a crimp bead onto one end of the wire. String through the closed jump ring and then back through the crimp bead so that the ring becomes “trapped” in the loop.
  • For a professional look, use a crimp tool to secure the crimp bead in place. (We made a great video on how to use this tool.) Alternatively one can secure the crimp bead in place by squeezing it with chain nose pliers.
  • String on 35 firepolish beads.
  • Feed a crimp bead and a closed jump ring onto the wire, then go back through the crimp bead so that the ring becomes “trapped” in the loop.
  • Position the crimp bead against the beads and secure it in place with a crimp tool.

    Prepare all six strands using the pattern described above.

    Prepare all six strands using the pattern described above.

Strand 3:

  • Cut the rolo chain so that it measures 6 1/2 inches in length.

Strand 4:

  • Use the same techniques outlined in Strand #2 only this time string 42 Swarovski pearls onto the wire.

Strand 5:

  • Use the same techniques outlined in Strand #2 only this time string 50 Swarovski bicones.

Strand 6:

  • Cut an 8 inch length of circle charm chain.

Assembling the Strands onto the End Bars

Attach each strand (in order of length) to one of the end bars with a jump ring.

Attach each strand (in order of length) to one of the end bars with a jump ring.

Each strand is attached to the end bars with jump rings starting with Strand #1, then Strand #2 and so on. The beaded strands use the jump ring already attached to the strand while the chains will require a new jump ring. This step is surprisingly difficult as the strands want to twist around each other and the jump rings seem to fly across the room. I prefer to assemble the strands on a flat surface in order to keep everything under control.

Connect the second side of each strand to the remaining end bar.

Connect the second side of each strand to the remaining end bar.

Finishing the Necklace & Adding the Clasp

  • Cut two lengths of circle charm chain that measure 5 inches each.
  • Use a new jump ring to attach one end of each chain to the top loop of the end bars.
  • Use a new jump ring to attach each side of the clasp to the opposite end of the chains.
Attach the remaining chain and clasp with jump rings. Wear & Repeat!

Attach the remaining chain and clasp with jump rings. Wear & Repeat!

WE LOVE READING YOUR COMMENTS!! When you make your version be sure to post a picture of it on our Facebook page for your chance to win the materials needed to make the brass version pictured above.

Winner will be chosen on February 27th so get beading!

DIY -Lattice Bracelet

latticebracelet

Beads & Supplies

Beads & Supplies

Tools Needed
Flush Wire Cutters
Crimp Tool or Chain Nose Pliers

Materials Needed
1 yard Softflex wire, size .014″
2 tube shaped crimp beads, size 2mm x 2mm
1 toggle clasp
11 Swarovski 6mm faceted round crystal beads
22 daisy spacer beads measuring 4mm across
5+ grams size 11/0 seedbeads

Designer’s Tip: This is a beginner level bracelet pattern.  The pattern is created by using a doubled length of Softflex wire and stringing through the beads in a figure 8 pattern. The 6mm beads can easily be replaced with any size or shape of bead. When using larger beads, the number of seedbeads strung between each lattice connection may need to be increased.

Attach the First Side of the Clasp

Step 1: Feed the Softflex wire through one end of the toggle clasp and position the clasp in the center of the stringing wire.

Step 2: Feed both ends of the wire through a crimp bead and position the crimp against the clasp. The resulting loop should be small but in no way constricting the movement of the clasp.

Step 3: For a professional look, use a crimp tool to secure the crimp bead in place.

Step 1 through Step 3

Secure one side of the clasp to a doubled length of Softflex wire with a crimp bead.

We have a great video on how to use this tool. (It’s a long video, jump to 2:59 for a quick review of how the crimp tool works.) Alternatively, the crimp bead can be secured in place by squeezing it with a pair of chain nose pliers.

String the Bead Pattern

Step 4: String 10 seedbeads onto each piece of wire.

Step 5: String 1 daisy spacer, 1 round crystal, and 1 daisy spacer onto one of the wire strands.

Step 6: Feed the other wire strand through the beads strung during the previous step in the opposite direction. This will create the figure-8 pattern.

Step 4 through Step 6

String 10 seedbeads on each wire. String onto one wire:1 spacer, 1 round bead, and 1 spacer bead. Feed the 2nd wire through the beads in the opposite direction making a figure-8 pattern.

Step 7: Repeat Step 4 through Step 6 ten more times or until the desired length is achieved.

Continue building the bracelet by repeating steps 4-6.

Continue building the bracelet by repeating steps 4-6.

Finishing the Bracelet

Step 8: String 10 seedbeads onto each piece of wire.

Step 9: Feed both ends of the wire through a crimp bead.

String 10 seedbeads on each wire. String both wires through the remaining crimp bead.

String 10 seedbeads on each wire. String both wires through the remaining crimp bead.

Step 10: Feed both ends of the wire through the loop of the second side of the clasp.

Step 11: Feed both ends of the wire back through the crimp bead so that the clasp becomes “trapped” in the loop and the wire ends are pointing toward the beads.

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String both wires through the clasp and then back through the crimp bead.

Step 12: For a professional look, use a crimp tool to secure the crimp bead in place. Alternatively, the crimp bead can be secured in place by squeezing it with a pair of chain nose pliers.

Step 13: Use wire cutters to cut off excess wire.

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Use a crimp tool to secure the crimp and cut off any excess wire.

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The completed bracelet!

WE LOVE READING YOUR COMMENTS!! Comment on this post for your chance to win a kit of materials to make your own. Winner will be chosen randomly and announced on January 30th!

Congrats lilisgems for winning the kit. Be sure to watch for our next DIY with another chance to win something new. Suggestions are always welcome, what do you want to learn?

DIY -3 Strand Leather Bracelet

Leather Bracelet Smaple

Tools Needed
Flush Wire Cutters
Chain Nose Pliers

Materials Needed
One shank style button to be used as a clasp
Eighteen 4mm 6/0 metal beads or use Japanese 6/0 glass seedbeads for added color
Four gold-plated pewter distressed ovals
Two and a half feet (30″) 1.5mm leather cord

This three strand bracelet is made with one continuous length of leather. The leather is doubled through the oval beads to create a clasp and lattice pattern. Be sure to scroll down to the bottom of this posting for a chance to win one of two GIVEAWAYS!

clasp

Step 1: String one oval bead and the button clasp onto the leather.

Step 2: Feed the leather back through the oval bead to “trap” the button in place. Position the leather so that one side measures about 8 inches from the button. (The longer side of leather will be used to complete a loop and additional bracelet strand later on.)

Bead stringing pattern for the first two strands of leather.

Bead stringing pattern for the first two strands of leather.

Step 3: Onto the longer length of leather cord string the following beads: 2 6/0 seedbeads, 1 oval, 2 6/0 seedbeads, 1 oval, 2 6/0 seedbeads, 1 oval.

Step 4: Onto the shorter length of leather cord string the following beads: 2 6/0 seedbeads, string through the 2nd oval used on the longer leather strand, 4 6/0 seedbeads, string through the 4th oval used on the longer leather strand.

Make a loop with the longer leather by feeding it back through the last oval bead.

Make a loop with the longer leather by feeding it back through the last oval bead.

Step 5: Make a loop on the end of the second side of the bracelet by feeding the longer leather cord back through the last oval bead.

Step 6: Size the bracelet so that the overall length measures approximately 8 inches. Final sizing adjustments will be made after stringing the final row.

Bead stringing pattern for final row of leather.

Bead stringing pattern for final row of leather.

Step 7: String the following beads onto the final length of leather: 2 6/0 seedbeads, string through the 2nd oval bead of the middle strand, 4 6/0 seedbeads, string through the final oval bead shared with the other two strand of leather.

Step 8: Size the bracelet. Before crimping the leather in place it is important to properly size the bracelet. The loops at each end should measure approximately 3/4″ each. Adjust the strands until the length fits your wrist loosely. When each strand is the same length the bracelet should lie relatively flat.

Using chain nose pliers, cut off the excess leather.

Using chain nose pliers, gently squeeze the oval bead closed.

Step 9: Using chain nose pliers, gently crimp down the oval beads at each end to secure the leather in place.

Step 10: Position each of the remaining oval beads approximately 2″ away from the closest ending oval bead. Using chain nose pliers, gently crimp down the two oval beads in the body of the bracelet. Crimping down these two beads will help keep the beads evenly distributed on the leather strands.

Use cutters to remove excess leather at the ends.

Use cutters to remove excess leather at the ends.

Step 11: Use wire cutters to remove the excess leather at each end.

WE LOVE READING YOUR COMMENTS!! Comment on this post for your chance to win one of these bracelets or a kit of materials to make your own (yup, two winners will be chosen). Winner will be chosen randomly and announced on October 31st.

DIY -Galaxy Bracelet

GalaxysamplesTools Needed
Light-duty wire cutters
Chain nose pliers (2 pairs are helpful)
Hypo-Tube cement

Materials Needed For a 7″ Bracelet
1 1/2 yards .5mm leather
1 foot 3mm rolo chain, cut into two 6″ lengths
7 inches 3mm rhinestone chain
Four 6mm 18 gauge jump rings
1 toggle clasp

This design is made by feeding leather through every other link of two chains using a figure-8 pattern. Rhinestone chain is “caught” in the middle by crossing the leather over both the front and the back of the chain, between the rhinestone links. When weaving the chain it is important to keep the leather loose so that it rests along the outside edge of the chain links.

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Step 1: Attach a jump ring to the 1st link of each rolo chain using two pairs of chain nose pliers.

TIP: Notice how the links of the rolo chain are positioned so that each link alternates direction, one facing forward, one facing sideways. The leather is woven through the vertical links (those facing sideways).

Step 2: Feed the leather through the third link of each chain so that there are equal lengths of leather coming out each side of the chains.

Step 3: Feed one end of the leather into the next vertical link of both chains and pull it through loosely, using a figure-8 pattern.

Step 4: Feed the second end of the leather through the chains using the same technique so that both cords are running through the same links.

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Step 5: Position the 1st link of the rhinestone chain between the two strands of leather, one piece in front and one piece behind the space in between the rhinestone links. Keep the tension on the leather loose enough for the rhinestone chain to be positioned between the two rolo chains and the leather cord resting on the outside edge of the horizontal link.

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Step 6: Continue weaving the bracelet, feeding the leather cords through the vertical links in a figure-8 pattern, catching one rhinestone link with each stitch. Weave until the bracelet is 1 inch shorter than the desired finished length.

TIP: When weaving, drape the chains over your hand as you feed the leathers through, flipping the piece over as you work, feeding one leather on the front side of the piece and feeding the other leather through the backside of the piece.

Step 7:  Cut off any remaining rhinestone chain links and cut the rolo chains so that there are two links beyond the final leather stitch.

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Step 8: Tie the two strands of leather together in a square knot on the inside of the bracelet. Use cement glue to secure the knot and allow it to dry for 10 minutes. When dry, trim the ends of the leather with light-duty wire cutters.

Step 9: Attach the last links of the rolo chain with a jump ring using two pair of chain nose pliers.

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Step 10: Finish both ends of the bracelet by attaching each end of the clasp with a jump ring.

Designer’s Note: Adjustments to length can be made by using either longer or shorter chains. Adding additional jump rings at the end of the bracelet can also increase length. Enjoy!!

A big shout-out goes to Dean for the great design idea! Thanks, Dean -BSG

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