Check out this unbelievable designer

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There are so many wonderful designs from this brand, BrokenFab, where do I even begin? The colors, the fresh shapes and motifs, it makes me feel like I’ve entered a wonderland of texture and style. There’s obviously a whimsical approach to design, but clearly a rich, informed palette and an eye for geometric splendor. I never knew I loved neon until now!

From designer Fabienne Morel’s bio:

“Heavily influenced by ‘80s and ‘90s club and pop culture, as well as post-modernist design, the intricately beaded rocaille pieces that Fabienne creates are rich in historical references. Strong geometrics recall classic album covers as well as an exploration of spiritualism, making for edgy, distinctive pieces that are wearable on a daily basis.”

I’m so in love!

See more delicious pieces:

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See more at http://www.brokenfab.com/1482672

DIY -Spikey Bracelet

newstudsI love the idea of punk meets classic; in this case, spikes meet seed beads! The construction of this pattern uses clamshell bead tips at each end. Since the thread used to make the bracelet is very fine, I use a seed bead as a stop-bead inside the bead tip. This technique allows one to anchor the thread at each end by feeding the thread through the bead tip, then the stop-bead, and then back through the bead tip positioning the thread for another pass through the bracelet. When adding a new length of thread to the project simply knot the old thread to the seed bead and knot the new one onto the same seed bead. In the end we will glue the knots and conceal it all by closing the bead tip shut!

Tools Neededmaterials300
Round Nose Pliers
Flush Wire Cutters or Sharp Scissors
Chain Nose Pliers

Materials Needed
Size 10 beading needles
Fireline thread
Japanese size 8/0 seed beads
Japanese size 11/0 seed beads
16 Glass Spike Beads 17mm x 7mm (Alternatively you can use any round 6mm bead to replace the spikes)
2 clamshell bead tips
2 heavy gauge jump rings
1 clasp
Hypo-tube cement

String the Base Row

Step 1: Thread the needle with a double arm’s length of Fireline. Double over the tail of the thread so that one side is about 1 foot longer, this will make the length  easier to manage.

Tie a stop-bead onto the end of the thread and string on the clamshell.

Tie a stop-bead onto the end of the thread and string on the clamshell bead tip.

Step 2: Tie a size 11/0 seed bead (stop-bead) onto the end of the longer thread, leaving a 4 inch tail.

Step 3: String through a clamshell bead tip so that the stop-bead rests inside the bead tip. Leave the bead tip open.

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String the beads to make the desired bracelet length. Secure the end of the bracelet by adding a new clamshell bead tip, followed by a stop-bead, and then string back through the bead tip and 1st spike bead.

Step 4: String the beads onto the thread in the following pattern: 1 spike, 2 size 8/0 seed beads, 1 spike. Continue stringing the bead pattern of 2 size 8/0 seed beads and 1 spike until the desired length of the bracelet is achieved. 16 spikes will make a bracelet approximately 7.5” long depending on the size of clasp chosen.

Step 5: String through the back-end of the 2nd bead tip.

Step 6: String a size 11/0 seed bead (stop-bead) onto the thread and then go back through the bead tip toward the beads.

Step 7: For added strength of the base row, string the needle and thread back through all of the beads and into the 1st bead tip. Anchor the thread by feeding the thread through the seed bead inside the bead tip and finally back through the bead tip and the 1st spike bead.

Add Seed Bead Embellishment to the Sides of the Spikes

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Add embellishment to both sides of the spike bead by stringing on six 11/0 seed beads and feeding the needle through the hole on the opposite end of the spike bead.

Step 8: With the thread coming out of a spike bead, string six size 11/0 seed beads. Feed the needle through the hole on the opposite end of the same spike bead. The seed beads will shape around the side of the spike bead. Repeat this step adding the same number of beads to the other side of the spike.

Step 9: Feed the needle through the two size 8/0 seed beads and the next spike.

Step 10: Repeat step 8 & 9 until each spike bead is embellished. When complete, anchor the thread by feeding the needle up through the bead tip, through the stop-bead, and then back through the bead tip.

Add Final Structure to the Base Row

Add structure by adding a size 8/0 seedbead in between each cluster of size 11/0 seedbeads. Repeat on the opposite side of the bracelet.

Add structure by adding a size 8/0 seed bead in between each cluster of size 11/0 seed beads. Repeat on the opposite side of the bracelet.

Step 11: Working on one side of the bracelet; feed the needle through the nearest six size 11/0 seed beads on one side of the spike bead. String on a new size 8/0 seed bead.

Step 12: Repeat step 11 for the length of the bracelet to add structure between the seed bead embellishment on the sides of the spike beads. Anchor the thread in the clamshell and repeat Step 11 on the opposite side of the bracelet.

Step 13: Knot the working thread to the stop-bead inside the clamshell.

Step 14: Secure the knots by dabbing them with GS Hypo-Tube Cement. Allow 5 minutes for the glue to dry then cut the thread ends with scissors or wire cutters.

Attach the Clasp

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Gently close the bead tips and use round nose pliers to round out and close the bead tips. Use chain nose pliers to attach the clasp to the bead tips with jump rings.

Step 15: Close the bead tips over the stop-bead and knots; first using your fingers and then giving the bead tips a final gentle squeeze with chain nose pliers.

Step 16: Using chain nose pliers, attach a jump ring to the loop of the bead tip and one side of the clasp. Repeat on the opposite side.

WE LOVE READING YOUR COMMENTS!! Comment on this post for your chance to win a kit of materials to make your own. Winner will be chosen randomly and announced on May 1st!

DIY -Textured Swag Necklace

With so many new beads arriving in the bead store I was feeling the need to use them all, or at least as many as I could fit in one necklace! This necklace uses basic beading techniques to build a wonderfully scrumptious necklace that is surprisingly lightweight and ever so easy to wear. Mix and match your favorite colors and shapes to make a different design each time!finishednecklace

Supplies

Supplies

Tools Needed
Flush Wire Cutters
2 pairs of chain Nose Pliers
Crimp Tool
Ruler or tape measure

Materials Needed
5 1/2 inches 4mm rhinestone chain
1 pair rhinestone chain crimp ends
6 1/2 inches 3mm rolo chain
18 inches circle charm chain
16 heavy 6mm jump rings
2 end bars with 6 holes
1 large toggle clasp
1 strand (35pcs) 4mm firepolished glass beads
1 strand (42pcs)4mm Swarovski crystal pearls
3 packages (50pcs) 4mm Swarovski crystal bicones
1 yard Softflex wire, size .014″ cut into 1 foot lengths
Six tube shaped crimp beads, size 2mm x 2mm

Designer’s Tip: Each strand is strung or cut to length before attaching the individual strands to the end bars. The graduated appearance is achieved by adding 1/2 inch of length to each strand. Measurements must include any added length created by crimp ends or crimp beads but do not include the jump ring that the Softflex is attached to. This tutorial lists the exact number of beads used for each strand,  if you are using different beads use  following the measurement guidelines as follows:

1st strand: 5 1/2 inches rhinestone chain
2nd strand: 6 inches of strung 4mm firepolish beads
3rd strand: 6 1/2 inches 3mm rolo chain
4th strand: 7 inches 4mm Swarovski pearls
5th strand: 7 1/2 inches 4mm Swarovski bicones
6th strand: 8 inches circle charm chain

Preparing the Six Strands

Attach the crimp ends onto a 5 1/2" length of rhinestone chain.

Attach the crimp ends onto a 5 1/2″ length of rhinestone chain.

Strand 1:

  • Place one end of the rhinestone chain into the crimp end and secure it in place by using chain nose pliers to gently fold the prongs inward against the rhinestone.
  • Cut the chain so that there are a total of 20 links (or 5 1/2″).
  • Attach the second crimp end on the opposite end of the chain.
Close two jump rings. String the beads and secure a jump ring on each end with a crimp bead.

Close two jump rings, secure the Softflex to the jump ring with a crimp bead, string the beads and secure another jump ring on the opposite end with a second crimp bead.

Strand 2:

  • Using chain nose pliers, close two jump rings.
  • Feed a crimp bead onto one end of the wire. String through the closed jump ring and then back through the crimp bead so that the ring becomes “trapped” in the loop.
  • For a professional look, use a crimp tool to secure the crimp bead in place. (We made a great video on how to use this tool.) Alternatively one can secure the crimp bead in place by squeezing it with chain nose pliers.
  • String on 35 firepolish beads.
  • Feed a crimp bead and a closed jump ring onto the wire, then go back through the crimp bead so that the ring becomes “trapped” in the loop.
  • Position the crimp bead against the beads and secure it in place with a crimp tool.

    Prepare all six strands using the pattern described above.

    Prepare all six strands using the pattern described above.

Strand 3:

  • Cut the rolo chain so that it measures 6 1/2 inches in length.

Strand 4:

  • Use the same techniques outlined in Strand #2 only this time string 42 Swarovski pearls onto the wire.

Strand 5:

  • Use the same techniques outlined in Strand #2 only this time string 50 Swarovski bicones.

Strand 6:

  • Cut an 8 inch length of circle charm chain.

Assembling the Strands onto the End Bars

Attach each strand (in order of length) to one of the end bars with a jump ring.

Attach each strand (in order of length) to one of the end bars with a jump ring.

Each strand is attached to the end bars with jump rings starting with Strand #1, then Strand #2 and so on. The beaded strands use the jump ring already attached to the strand while the chains will require a new jump ring. This step is surprisingly difficult as the strands want to twist around each other and the jump rings seem to fly across the room. I prefer to assemble the strands on a flat surface in order to keep everything under control.

Connect the second side of each strand to the remaining end bar.

Connect the second side of each strand to the remaining end bar.

Finishing the Necklace & Adding the Clasp

  • Cut two lengths of circle charm chain that measure 5 inches each.
  • Use a new jump ring to attach one end of each chain to the top loop of the end bars.
  • Use a new jump ring to attach each side of the clasp to the opposite end of the chains.
Attach the remaining chain and clasp with jump rings. Wear & Repeat!

Attach the remaining chain and clasp with jump rings. Wear & Repeat!

WE LOVE READING YOUR COMMENTS!! When you make your version be sure to post a picture of it on our Facebook page for your chance to win the materials needed to make the brass version pictured above.

Winner will be chosen on February 27th so get beading!

DIY -Lattice Bracelet

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Beads & Supplies

Beads & Supplies

Tools Needed
Flush Wire Cutters
Crimp Tool or Chain Nose Pliers

Materials Needed
1 yard Softflex wire, size .014″
2 tube shaped crimp beads, size 2mm x 2mm
1 toggle clasp
11 Swarovski 6mm faceted round crystal beads
22 daisy spacer beads measuring 4mm across
5+ grams size 11/0 seedbeads

Designer’s Tip: This is a beginner level bracelet pattern.  The pattern is created by using a doubled length of Softflex wire and stringing through the beads in a figure 8 pattern. The 6mm beads can easily be replaced with any size or shape of bead. When using larger beads, the number of seedbeads strung between each lattice connection may need to be increased.

Attach the First Side of the Clasp

Step 1: Feed the Softflex wire through one end of the toggle clasp and position the clasp in the center of the stringing wire.

Step 2: Feed both ends of the wire through a crimp bead and position the crimp against the clasp. The resulting loop should be small but in no way constricting the movement of the clasp.

Step 3: For a professional look, use a crimp tool to secure the crimp bead in place.

Step 1 through Step 3

Secure one side of the clasp to a doubled length of Softflex wire with a crimp bead.

We have a great video on how to use this tool. (It’s a long video, jump to 2:59 for a quick review of how the crimp tool works.) Alternatively, the crimp bead can be secured in place by squeezing it with a pair of chain nose pliers.

String the Bead Pattern

Step 4: String 10 seedbeads onto each piece of wire.

Step 5: String 1 daisy spacer, 1 round crystal, and 1 daisy spacer onto one of the wire strands.

Step 6: Feed the other wire strand through the beads strung during the previous step in the opposite direction. This will create the figure-8 pattern.

Step 4 through Step 6

String 10 seedbeads on each wire. String onto one wire:1 spacer, 1 round bead, and 1 spacer bead. Feed the 2nd wire through the beads in the opposite direction making a figure-8 pattern.

Step 7: Repeat Step 4 through Step 6 ten more times or until the desired length is achieved.

Continue building the bracelet by repeating steps 4-6.

Continue building the bracelet by repeating steps 4-6.

Finishing the Bracelet

Step 8: String 10 seedbeads onto each piece of wire.

Step 9: Feed both ends of the wire through a crimp bead.

String 10 seedbeads on each wire. String both wires through the remaining crimp bead.

String 10 seedbeads on each wire. String both wires through the remaining crimp bead.

Step 10: Feed both ends of the wire through the loop of the second side of the clasp.

Step 11: Feed both ends of the wire back through the crimp bead so that the clasp becomes “trapped” in the loop and the wire ends are pointing toward the beads.

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String both wires through the clasp and then back through the crimp bead.

Step 12: For a professional look, use a crimp tool to secure the crimp bead in place. Alternatively, the crimp bead can be secured in place by squeezing it with a pair of chain nose pliers.

Step 13: Use wire cutters to cut off excess wire.

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Use a crimp tool to secure the crimp and cut off any excess wire.

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The completed bracelet!

WE LOVE READING YOUR COMMENTS!! Comment on this post for your chance to win a kit of materials to make your own. Winner will be chosen randomly and announced on January 30th!

Congrats lilisgems for winning the kit. Be sure to watch for our next DIY with another chance to win something new. Suggestions are always welcome, what do you want to learn?

DIY -3 Strand Leather Bracelet

Leather Bracelet Smaple

Tools Needed
Flush Wire Cutters
Chain Nose Pliers

Materials Needed
One shank style button to be used as a clasp
Eighteen 4mm 6/0 metal beads or use Japanese 6/0 glass seedbeads for added color
Four gold-plated pewter distressed ovals
Two and a half feet (30″) 1.5mm leather cord

This three strand bracelet is made with one continuous length of leather. The leather is doubled through the oval beads to create a clasp and lattice pattern. Be sure to scroll down to the bottom of this posting for a chance to win one of two GIVEAWAYS!

clasp

Step 1: String one oval bead and the button clasp onto the leather.

Step 2: Feed the leather back through the oval bead to “trap” the button in place. Position the leather so that one side measures about 8 inches from the button. (The longer side of leather will be used to complete a loop and additional bracelet strand later on.)

Bead stringing pattern for the first two strands of leather.

Bead stringing pattern for the first two strands of leather.

Step 3: Onto the longer length of leather cord string the following beads: 2 6/0 seedbeads, 1 oval, 2 6/0 seedbeads, 1 oval, 2 6/0 seedbeads, 1 oval.

Step 4: Onto the shorter length of leather cord string the following beads: 2 6/0 seedbeads, string through the 2nd oval used on the longer leather strand, 4 6/0 seedbeads, string through the 4th oval used on the longer leather strand.

Make a loop with the longer leather by feeding it back through the last oval bead.

Make a loop with the longer leather by feeding it back through the last oval bead.

Step 5: Make a loop on the end of the second side of the bracelet by feeding the longer leather cord back through the last oval bead.

Step 6: Size the bracelet so that the overall length measures approximately 8 inches. Final sizing adjustments will be made after stringing the final row.

Bead stringing pattern for final row of leather.

Bead stringing pattern for final row of leather.

Step 7: String the following beads onto the final length of leather: 2 6/0 seedbeads, string through the 2nd oval bead of the middle strand, 4 6/0 seedbeads, string through the final oval bead shared with the other two strand of leather.

Step 8: Size the bracelet. Before crimping the leather in place it is important to properly size the bracelet. The loops at each end should measure approximately 3/4″ each. Adjust the strands until the length fits your wrist loosely. When each strand is the same length the bracelet should lie relatively flat.

Using chain nose pliers, cut off the excess leather.

Using chain nose pliers, gently squeeze the oval bead closed.

Step 9: Using chain nose pliers, gently crimp down the oval beads at each end to secure the leather in place.

Step 10: Position each of the remaining oval beads approximately 2″ away from the closest ending oval bead. Using chain nose pliers, gently crimp down the two oval beads in the body of the bracelet. Crimping down these two beads will help keep the beads evenly distributed on the leather strands.

Use cutters to remove excess leather at the ends.

Use cutters to remove excess leather at the ends.

Step 11: Use wire cutters to remove the excess leather at each end.

WE LOVE READING YOUR COMMENTS!! Comment on this post for your chance to win one of these bracelets or a kit of materials to make your own (yup, two winners will be chosen). Winner will be chosen randomly and announced on October 31st.

Huib Petersen: Flowers, Ocean Life and Right-Angle Weave

Huib Petersen
Showing at Baubles & Beads
Thru September 30th

For many years Huib Petersen’s jewelry enchanted those of us lucky enough to connect with him. With a studio in San Francisco, he was one of our local treasures. After nearly two decades he remains a local treasure, the greatest difference being that we must now share him with the world. Recognized internationally for his designs and instruction, Huib is now one of the most sought after designers for bead woven jewelry depicting flowers, ocean life, and right-angle weave structured forms. We are honored to showcase 18 pieces from his collection, including bracelets, necklaces and handlets, each piece worthy of awe.

Wall Flowers

Wall Flowers Necklace

Needlecrafts first caught Huib’s attention when he was a child growing up in a small town in Holland. Encouraged by his mom, grandma, and the local needlecraft store owner, he picked up crochet, knitting, tatting, macramé, bobbin lace, needle lace, and embroidery with ease.

Going Medieval

Going Medieval

In high school, Huib discovered the theater and loved every aspect of it. He strengthened his existing skills and learned new ones — acting, directing, puppetry, costume design, stage design, backdrop painting, singing, and writing.

In 1995, Huib moved from Holland to San Francisco and opened a small arts and crafts workshop and gallery on Nob Hill. Inspired by a chance encounter with 19th-century Russian beadwork, he discovered the beauty and challenges of designing with beads.

Swim Around My Wrist Bracelets

Swim Around My Wrist Bracelets

Huib uses different sizes of beads as a building material — like little bricks — and a variety of traditional stitches as a flexible, tensile sort of mortar. Placing beads one by one, row by row on top of each other, he combines his needlework, theater, and jewelry skills to create sculpted bugs, butterflies, birds, and sea creatures in their environments. The result is a unique kind of wearable art that offers the intricacy of embroidery and lace, the depth of a theater set and the durability and brilliance of glass.

Enchanted Waters

Enchanted Waters

Huib has been doing beadwork full-time for many years and all of his pieces are unique. His work is featured in Beading Across America. As an instructor, his endless creative energy is very apparent in the classroom and to all of us who know and work with him.

You can view more of Huib’s work on exhibit at our store in Berkeley, CA or visit his website.

The Work of Eleanor Pigman

Eleanor Pigman
Showing at Baubles & Beads
June 21st-August 8th, 2013

It is amazing how small our big world has become. I first became familiar with Eleanor when she posted a picture of her work on the Baubles & Beads Facebook page. It was a little bead embroidered jellyfish with fabric tentacles and a body made of freshwater pearl and glass beads. Just looking at the picture of that jellyfish transported me to an imagined cottage by the sea with the sound of waves crashing over the beach and this perfect little beaded jellyfish framed on the wall.  I felt drawn to her work and shared the photo. A couple of messages later I was scrolling through her blog and discovered she had much more to share and we promptly invited her to exhibit her work at Baubles & Beads.

When the artwork arrived I opened the box immediately, excited to finally see her work up close. The moment was reminiscent of a Christmas morning when, finally, I get to see what is inside those wrapped boxes.  To my delight and amusement the first piece to slide from the packaging was a portrait of Al Gore.

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Her work is composed of glass seed beads (mostly size 11/0’s) sewn onto felt with fabric backgrounds. As an avid beader I am looking at the work with a different perspective than most people. I visually scan the piece for each individual stitch and find it comforting to spot a stray thread as if it serves as proof that this work was indeed made hand.

A work in progress. Notice the light sketching of lines on the felt.

A work in progress. Notice the light sketching of lines on the felt.

Especially interesting in the collection are the pieces with raised textures. Some of the shapes are sewn into padded material giving the work dimension. Eleanor also encircles choice beads and colorful fabric swatches with peyote stitch to create a coral effect. This effect makes one want to investigate the piece further, to peer into the little window to see what could be lurking inside.

Both of these works feature raised textures.

Both of these works feature raised textures.

To add yet another dimension to her work, some of the beaded pieces extend beyond the mat board as if to reach out and become a part of our dimension.

Two great example of the artwork "escaping" from the confines of the mat board.

Two great example of the artwork “escaping” from the confines of the mat board.

Eleanor also effectively uses color and lines to create visual dimension in her work.

Eleanor also effectively uses color and lines to create visual dimension in her work.

Many of the pieces are mounted into 5x7 mats.

Many of the pieces are mounted into 5×7 mats.

Be sure to stop by the store and check out the exhibit.

Learn more about Eleanor Pigman and her work by viewing her artist statement and bio.

All of Eleanor Pigman’s work exhibited at Baubles & Beads is available for purchase. If you are unable to view the work in person check out her Etsy Store: Epigman.

Look Who’s Teaching @ The Bead And Button Show!

While looking over our newest class schedule I realized that six (Yes SIX!) of our instructors are also teaching at The Bead And Button Show in June. If you aren’t familiar with the show check out their website and be prepared to be AMAZED. It is the world’s largest bead show offering more than 750 classes in the span of 12 days. Many of the classes offered by our instructors are also available to attend locally at our store. Hmmm, it feels good to rub elbows with the bead famous. To read full descriptions of each of these instructor’s classes taught at the show follow this link and search by the instructor’s name.

Lisa Claxton

Lisa Claxton's classes at Bead & Button

Lisa Claxton’s classes at Bead & Button

This year she is offering 5 wire classes at Bead & Button; one of which is a 3-day workshop called The Fundamentals of Wirework. In addition to teaching Basic Wire Work at our store, each of her other classes are often offered at Baubles & Beads. In fact, she often debuts her classes at our store before offering them at national bead shows. There are beady perks to living in the Bay Area! She is currently offering Leaf & Vine Bracelet, Herringbone Weave Wire Wrapping, Stamp It On Metal, Byzantine Bracelet, Crochet Shell Cluster Bracelet, Fused Ball Link Chain, Fused Fine Silver Chains, Stone Medallion Pendant, Dreams of Viking Knit & Crystals, and Wire Bezels at Baubles & Beads. She is also a contributor in the book Stamped Metal Jewelry.

Teri Dannenberg Lawson

Teri Dannenberg Lawson's classes at Bead & Button

Teri Dannenberg Lawson’s classes at Bead & Button

By day Teri helps develop science curriculum for middle school kids. By night she is a seedbead queen, figuring out how she can stitch those seedbeads into fabulous designs inspired by nature. Although she currently does not have any classes scheduled at Baubles & Beads, keep a lookout for her inspiring use of color and form to grace our class schedule this summer.

Huib Petersen

Huib Peterson's classes at Bead & Button

Huib Petersen’s classes at Bead & Button

Huib’s work is always an inspiration to anyone who loves nature or bead weaving. He is teaching seven classes at the Bead & Button show this year. His work is featured in the new book, Beading Across America. While he travels internationally to teach he always makes time to share his skills with students at Baubles & Beads. This session he is offering a special 3-part comprehensive course, Peyote Stitch & Beyond: Fundamentals in Beading and Up & Over.

Kate Richbourg

Kate Richbourg's classes at Bead & Button

Kate Richbourg’s classes at Bead & Button

Kate is a master of all things beads and metal. She has shared her skills with us through classes for over 15 years. Her new book Simple Soldering A Beginner’s Guide To Soldering is chock full of projects and ideas that will get your torch heated up. In addition to many articles in bead magazines she is also a project contributor in Stamped Metal Jewelry. This session Kate is teaching Crystal Framed Ring and Patinas & Cold Connections at Baubles & Beads.

Anat Silvera

Anat Silvera's classes at Bead & Button

Anat Silvera’s classes at Bead & Button

Anat has had a long history at Baubles & Beads. Over decades she has taught wirework, enameling, metalwork, stringing and design classes at our store. Her current love of torch fired enamels and forging metals is demostrated in her class lineup at our store. This session Anat is teaching Beads & Leather Bracelet, Fold Form Components, Introduction to Enameling, Enamel On Curved Forms, The Fandango Necklace, Fused Silver & Copper Bracelet, Multistrand Necklace, Soldering & Enameling, Spiral Fold Fantasy, and Wire Wrapped Cabochon.

Joe Silvera

Joe Silvera's classes at Bead & Button

Joe Silvera’s classes at Bead & Button

With the release of his first book, Soldering Made Simple: Easy techniques for the kitchen table jeweler, Joe has been busy teaching at many national bead shows and at his own school, The Silvera Jewelry School. We keep him pretty busy at Baubles & Beads too! This session he is offering Basic Metalsmithing, Basic Soldering, Bezel Set Pendant, Fusing with Argentium, The Mural Ring, and Twisted Bangles.

New Multi-Strand Toggles

Just in: Multi-strand toggles by Tierra Cast. These clasps make it easy to make a bead laden bracelet in no time. We whipped this one up using seedbeads, Softflex Wire, jump rings and crimp beads. Learn how to attach the crimp beads with our tutorial.

DSlot-Clasps

The clasps are available in three finishes.

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